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. foreigners sneak into america and take american jobs, there ought to be a law, government ought to do something. that's just the way pple think, it's instinct. i have to admit how i used to think, took me decades to realize i was wrong, passing a law often does more harm than good. and progress comes from millions of individuals acting to make themselves better off guided by an invisible hand that inadvertently helps others. not to viewers of the "stossel" show, but to normal people. when there is a problem, government should address it. my next guest says they know what our brain is wired that way. an evolutionary psychiatrist at the university of california santa barbara and the author of the mind of the market. so, there is your book, let me start with you since you talk about the mind. you say the faith in government comes from evolution and? >> the natural propensity we have is if people have more stuff than somebody else, there must have been something else done wrong, something immoral, something unfair because in the small band of hunter and gatherer in very resource poor envi
and the great government consulting as they pick the products to bring a lot of innovation to san francisco. cory? give cory a round of applause. [applause] >> thank you, chris. thank you so much for all of your hard work, chris. none of this could be possible without your efforts. good evening. the good government awards are incredibly important in san francisco. it's a chance for us to honor the tremendous work that happens in the city and also to honor the individuals who are responsible for some of that success. congratulations to all of our honorees. we're very grateful for your work. let's give a hand for them. [applause] the good government awards also support spur's good government work. it is a central part of our mission. our agenda is admittedly ambitious. we analyze every local measure on the san francisco ballot, which until recently was a pretty formidable task. we participate in most of the major issues of city government from pension and payroll tax reform to some of the most important discussions on how we fund a lot of our public services, whether that finding different re
citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets put out by city government are data sets that i think show us in a very positive way. from my perspective, it's important for us to keep on pushing data sets that allow us to de
capabilities and capacity building up security forces then both the afghan government and the united states will be doing exactly what the enemies want. >> there has been some progress in peace efforts to the afghan government and the taliban. last month negotiators secured pakistan's coop trying help with the process. representatives of the taliban, the afghan government met face-to-face. president karzai announced plans for an office in qatar. karzai heads to the united states next month to discuss the u.s. presence here through 2014 and beyond. others will withdraw their troops more quickly than planned. the killing of an american in the heart of kabul won't boost support for an already unpopular war. >> chief editor of the kabul newspaper said that insider attacks are hampering the fight against taliban and al qaeda. >> the taliban are behind all of these attacks. it means their presence in security forces is strong. but recently, the afghan police as well as the allen army are preparing some new plans and programs to advise any injection of taliban elements within the afghan security f
need to back loans and banks were not in the mood to gamble on real-estate so the government would try to make banks feel more secure. the housing act of 1934 created the federal housing administration, the fha. provides insurance to banks who know they get their money back but even with the f h a, banks still might feel nervous. they might want somebody to buy those mortgages from them. in that same housing act of 1934 congress made provisions for a new breed of privately-owned firms called national mortgage association's. they were to buy fha insured loans. just one problem. no private investors wanted to do it. so finally four years later, 1938, the roosevelt and ministration created the federal national mortgage association which became known as fannie mae. was a tiny federal agency. what brought that companies would not do uncle sam would. this was not considered big news at the time. the wall street journal buried the story on page 2 and it was only eight sentences long. i want to point out that was before i started at the journal. otherwise we would have had a bigger story and i
whether the government should be throwing your tax dollars at industry the first place. i asked robert bryce, senior fellow at the manhattan institute about this issue. let's start with the tax credit. >> sure. gerri: this is industry, let's face it they don't have a whole lot to show for themselves yet we subsidize them to the tune of $1.2 billion. why? >> remember the industry said we're all about reducing carbon dioxide. that was the whole argument. now it shifted we create jobs argument. if congress does not extend production tax credit we'll lose 37,000 jobs. they might get an extension but there is big push among utilities, a lot of groups to end the tax credit and it very well could be ended. gerri: it doesn't work that well. 84% fail to produce electricity when the demand is great. as a solution to our energy problems how would you rate it? >> it is not a solution and it is wholly dependent on electric utilities and electric generation that can be dispatched. we can't count on wind. when demand is highest wind output is generally at its lowest. that's a big problem. gerri: iron
"our form of government has no sense unless it is founded in the deeply felt religious faith and i do not care what it is." he received a much ridicule from his cultured despise years. his professed indifference to the major of the religious faith. it is the first part of the statement that deserves continuing attention. certainly many americans, perhaps the majority of them, agreed that democracy or at least our democracy, which is based on a belief in natural rights, presupposes religious faith. people believe this that all people are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights. there are two separate propositions that are pertinent to any consideration of the role of religion in american politics. one is an empirical question. is it a fact that the success of a democracy requires a religious people governing themselves by religious norms? the second question is a question of logic. does belief in america as distinctive and democracy, a limited government whose limits are defined by the natural rights of the government, do those entail religious beliefs? regarding the e
others around the world are celebrating the holiday. anti-government rebels in syria said there in control of the border town with turkey. around 700 people have crossed the border to find refuge in turkey. more than half of a million people have fled from syria, and the syrian president bashar al- assad has said he would do whatever he can to end the violence to on boy -- envoy lakhdar brahimi. zeina khodr, what about this story that they have taken the border town? >> it is a small town, but there has been a long, difficult fight over three months. they have had between 100 and two hundred soldiers held up. was a difficult fight for the rebels. strategic, it is not in the sense that it will allow them to make further advances, but the rebels are trying to clear the border region from government forces. when now, they control most of the border region aside from a main border crossing. >> what about the context with lakhdar brahimi's visit to damascus? >> well, as we know, very little progress on the political front, which means more fighting is expected, but what we hav
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
again to swiftly join his government and put an end to deflation. he says it's only natural for the government to get involved in shaping monetary policy noting that conventional steps have failed to pull japan out of the drawn-out price downturn. abe made his call with officials of the japan business federation or keidanren on tuesday. >> translator: soon after we form a new cabinet tomorrow, i hope the government can establish a policy accord with the bank of japan to set an inflation target of 2%. the bank should be held accountable to meeting the target. >> last week boj policymakers decided to decide whether to set the 2% target in january. the bank's current goal is 1%. meanwhile the keidanren chairman is stepping up efforts to lift the nation's sagging economy. he said the landslide election victory signals the party's hope to regain a strong japan. >> translator: i think a wide variety of policies including monetary policy should be implemented to get the economy back on track. they will together help trigger economic growth again. >> he also expressed his support fo
. they planned to set up an administration with government and anti-government forces. he plans to pull power from the assad administration to a new government. but the opposition wants to overthrow the assad administration and the government regards the opposition as terrorist. >>> two insider attacks in afghanistan have rattled the international security forces. an afghan policewoman shot and killed a u.s. contractor in the capital kabul. the victim was a security consultant for the police. other officers detained the woman at the scene. her motive is unknown. another afghan police officer opened fire at a checkpoint in the northern province of jasjon. he killed five colleagues and fled the site. police believe he was a member of the taliban. afghan soldiers and police officers have killed more than 50 members of the international forces this year. the taliban has not claimed responsibility for the kabul shooting, but the group claims to have placed members in the military and police force to launch insider attacks. >>> japan's air self-defense force scrambled fighter jets after a chinese a
into england. fly them over there, seized the airfield. the shock might be so great that the british government will cave in or negotiate your instead what the germans did was, of course they stop at the ocean. then he turned south and they wanted to knock france out of the war, which is what they did. they entered paris on june 16, i think. the government in paris led to the south. they were practically in a different city every day. and churchill hoped and pleaded with the french to continue fighting. both countries have pledged, one to another, that they would not drop out of the war and make a separate peace, unless they were released from this pledge by the other. the french began to think that they would want to make a separate peace, and they began to talk to the british about this. churchill said no, we can't release you from that pledge. we want you to keep fighting all the way down to the mediterranean, if you have to. and if you have to across the mediterranean, keep fighting from north africa. and a big part of the reason was that the french fleet was a very, very large fleet. many
is a lower price again companies trying to have to pay the government more money. gerri: let's talk about 201 201n what we might expect. expectations over the place. citigroup predicd stocks 14% next year, morgan stanley 1%. where do you fall? >> i'm probably up at 4% or 5%. not expecting that great of a year as far as the end of the year. i think it will be pretty bumpy the beginning of the year while this all gets worked out and people reevaluate the landscape ofds everything. gerri, i will comment on the numbers you threw out there. this scares me people are positive. i don't want to spike the eggnog, but the fact there is not one person or one bank that says the market wille down next year frightens me a little bit. gerri: wells fargo says the market will be down 2%. but they're the only ones to sae it. a lotbo of optimism but we have beenbe in this bull market for a long time it v has been very strong. people start that in the same thing happen over and over again. is that what you see your fellow strategists make? >>sometimes, you chase the returns and d up getting in at the last minute
the exchange, leaving it up to the federal government government to implement exchanges. the president's health care law was so unpopular when the president signed it into law and it remains absolutely that two years later. apparently nancy pelosi was right about the obamacare program, at least when she uttered these now infamous words, calling for passage of the legislation. >> we have to pass the bill so that you can find out what is in it. away from the father of the controversy. lou: is getting rid of obamacare so one option for republicans? we will talk with legal analyst peter johnson on the way forward. also, the worsening political crisis in egypt. splitting egypt between those who want the islamic state, governed by sharia law, and those who oppose it. andrew boston this year. the professor and the author of the new book "sharia versus freedom." in the nation's credit rating is at risk. serious proposals to reduce the deficit and really end our national debt. potentially, a significant blow to the obamacare controversial o contraceptive mandate. the eighth circuit court of appeals in t
fried government's. look at the population data. i hear about nigeria because of of -- overpopulation. they have 174 people per square mile. that is half of the netherlands and they are rich. one-tenth ofongkong and singapore and they are really which. >> the resource is the mind. john: more people more brains. >> more people closer together means more conversations. john: i have been told we're running out ofuel. jimmy carter said that. it would have been within the next decade, 30 years ago. >> that implies a prices should be rising. of decades oil has been getting cheaper and cheaper. even if it does get cheaper people look for a substitute. they keep inventing new ways to take more oil. have much more stores of oil the out than president carter said. let's go to the myth of your personal choice. with talk about contrarian pular advice for un-schooling your kids who founded by james altucher. what do you mean by un-schooling? >> they are taught to go to the bathroom, walk, move, pay attention in the school. what do they remember? john: most people do not want to home school. we tru
of their recruiting. >> they realize this but it would be hard for any government agent to say i'm going to support a buy polar agent who is sleeping with an as lamb i can radical. >> in some ways it highlights those things more in terms of one person. through the whole journey of frost nixon, his relationship which garn in a small theater in london, then broadway, then a movie. the very first preview performance of frost nixon in a theater in london, the entire back row was lawyers, the third preview david there was having been given the all clear or told you should go see it yourself and he was shaken by it to begin w. for a man who is incredibly generous and warm and positive and supportive of everything, i think he felt very confused by how he should react to this. and as the whole thing went on as it started to become clear this was going to be a massive hit in terms of the play and the theater version of it, he started to get behind it because he's a very good business man and he started to go, well, okay, there is a certain amount of this i don't believe actually happened and is not true and
before they went into government. but about the queen and the family and lifting the vail. you thrift veil and this is an extraordinary world we've never seen inside of. so "the queen r queen" came directly from the deal. >> what did tony blair think of it? >> next question. >> i want to know president obama said "homeland" is his favorite show. my question is when you're dealing with live, real people who you are portraying or in the case of "homeland" or "24" when you're trying to deal with agencies that you are representing, what is that interaction like? we were talking a little bit in the room next door, maybe you can answer michael, how is tony blair's perception changed as a result of those films or the queen's perception changed in the minds of the public then we can talk about "homeland" and "24"? >> there are many things that you realize that you are working with when you do a film or a tv show that is -- has so much political emphasis. and one of the things is inevitably you come up against the agenda of people in terms of the agendas they have for looking at and judging po
the dollar against the yen after liberal democratic party leader shinzo abe said his new government may reach an agreement with japan's central bank on an inflation target. there is speculation the central bank may come under further pressure for monetary easing measures. the dollar/yen is currently trading at 84.82 to 85. >> catherine, the incoming leader abe has even mentioned revising the bank of japan law which adds more pressure onto the central bank of japan. now, a bit of background, the boj decided last week to extend its asset purchase program by 10 trillion yen, but many investors think the bank needs to do more, still. let's go to ramin mellegard who is at the tokyo stock exchange to get a check on how all of this is affecting tokyo markets. ramin, good morning. >> good morning to you. markets really keeping a close eye on the weaker yen here, and if it's going to weaken further, in fact, and really that's been leading to the gains in stocks that we've been seeing. i also need to keep an eye on the developments of the u.s. fiscal cliff and whether that's going to be resolved or not
begin to realize they need a stronger federal government to reroute archons dictation. many, many americans were posted to comp dictation and he became the anti-federalist. they were the federalist and anti-federalist, bitterly opposed to each other from the very beginning, from the signing of the constitution. the anti-federalist gradually became no as republican and democrat republicans. so when john quincy adams was running for office, you now how the republicans or democrat republicans running against the federalist and he was the last of the federalists. the federalist rambis from the beginning, washington and the people who ran the country were really friendly elite. the constitution only other property owners. gradually universal suffrage came in, not universal involving women. don't get your hopes up too high it was white male suffrage, but she didn't have to be a property owner and that was what pushed to the elite out of power. adams, jefferson, monroe's, all these great plantation owners and property owners and elite leaders really permitted the growth of jacksonian dem
important single commodity. the south refuse to sell cotton unless the british and french government recognize its independence, which put tremendous pressure on europe to intervene in favor of the confederate. the european statesmen at the beginning of 1862, considered the unions caused to be hopeless. quote it is the highest degree likely that the north will not be able to subdue the south. british prime minister lord pomerance and told us for an officers. meanwhile, the lincoln government appeared overwhelmed. congress and the white house were in the hands of a political party that it never government before. the treasury department was broke. federal spending was multiplied as never before. in 1862, the u.s. government spent six times as much money as it spent in 1861. and where would it come from? northern banks, and an economic panic had closed their exchange windows in late december, refusing to redeem paper money. meanwhile, rebel soldiers menace washington from nearby manassas virginia where they had routed the union army a few months earlier. confederate artillery they atom
cut out of this government, geronimo. and carol says sandra of time mt from new york neil: easier said than done, one of theoude lou: one of the loudest vocal critics in the community says he is still frustrated.isrustra how are you, ed? >> i'm a little frustrated but outstanding. people are desperate at the grassroots level all the waylee out. neil: the fallout is "fast and furious." how bad does this debt?s. >> i think it is getting really? dangerous getting really dangerous. because most companies right now are in survival mode. they don't know what the future's going to be like. they can't get access to capital. customers are scared to death. we are doing stupid thing like converting corn to fuel, we are sitting on great oil reserves, natural gas, doing nothing with it. we are building solar plants in the west. it is the stupidest thing i've ever heard in my life. neil: i am going to hold you down to a maybe on green energy. [laughter] you have been a bipartisan on pitol hill. wasting time as we pile $4 billion of debt every day. they are waiting for november for some closure. when
more memories i want to share. one deals with government and jazz. chris always wanted to work for the state department. he always wanted to be involved in the foreign service. he took the foreign service exam when we were undergrads at cal. he came back the first time, pleased with results on the written but felt he didn't do so well on the orals. the question that seemed to trip him up and left him perplexed was the following. mr. stevens, please compare american government and jazz music. chris told us he didn't quite know how to handle that question. my suggestion involved people blowing loudly on their horns or banging loud' on their drums was not terribly helpful. we decided to ask questions to trip up the applicant. we didn't have the internet to find a quick answer but figured it out. though chris may not have come up with the answer during that exam he certainly lived the message taught by this interesting comparison. both american democracy and jazz music involved ongoing experimentation. they involve unscripted action and improvisation as we figure out the best way t
cuts and tax increases will impact how much money states get from the federal government. ruben ramirez reports from washington. >> reporter: we all know the numbers. failing to reach a deal by january 1 will result in $109 billion in automatic cuts to federal spending. and while that's a big number, what matters most to states and municipalities is the small print, detailing just where those cuts will happen. and standard & poors' gabe pettek says those details could still be months away. >> even if the policymakers in washington, d.c., resolve the immediate issue before january 1 or shortly thereafter, we think there are going to be several details related to the administration of tax policy and the way the federal government spends money that will have an important effect on state budgets. >> reporter: the pew center on the states reports around 18% of federal grants to states would be subject to sequestration's spending cuts. that works out to about $7.5 billion the states could ultimately lose. >> the real worry right now for states is that as many states start there legislative se
for people, creating efficiency with the government being able to manage transactions, creating a platform for people to actually interact with the city on a level that hasn't been done before. so, ideally, using the san francisco rec and park, the future san francisco arts app, using our mobile commerce to manage that is creating jobs, revenue, and efficiency for the public and tourists to be able to navigate san francisco in a way that hasn't been done before. thank you. >> all right. (applause) >> so, we're going to show another application from motion launch, the founder and ceo, john, will be sharing some of the work that they're doing. they're based here out of san francisco and they've got a great announcement to make. >> i am jon mills. i'm ceo of motion loft. we started about three years ago developing sensors that we could place around cities that would give us some analytics on how people move around cities and how vehicles drive around cities. so, currently we have 16 neighborhoods -- 18 neighborhoods covered in san francisco, and we get real-time data back that shows exactly h
and whether the government would do anything about it. before they got to the question, there's a whole string of questions that turned out to be not unrelated, although it seemed like at the time. several reporters ask about the increase in soviet shipping traffic to the island of cuba and nobody knew what was happening and what that meant, but a couple more months we would know exactly what that was about. i was not in the end i related to a person was talking about in "silent spring." you could also hear the president referred to ms. carson spoke. he said we are going to look into this problem, especially in light of ms. carson's book. what's interesting is 1962, no further introduction was needed. rachel carson, the celebrated author of three books about the ocean, beautiful, lyrical books that were these wonderful transforming experiences for readers. carson had only taken science and translating it to beautiful narrative that everybody could relate to and so she'd become one of america's most celebrated a beloved authors in the silent spring turned a very different direction. "silent spr
. after a week of violence and attempts to gain control, the key government buildings are located here. after certain days of protests, making a public plea for calm. >> i am deeply sad that this is leading to clashes between protesters and the police forces. this crime was not justified, but violence will not serve. >> many feel the government has lost. especially after events over the weekend. police fired several rounds of tear gas and used water cannons to break up the protests. scores of people were injured on both sides. some were critically wounded. they were angry after the her with a gang rape last week, when a young woman was attacked so broadly, she is fighting for life. it goes beyond this one incident. people want a strong action from -- from thent's government. until then, they are prepared to keep the heat on. >> a delay until tuesday. the constitution in egypt was supposed to be passed, but now, the electoral commission says they will be looking at allegations of irregularities in the voting process. we were sent this report from cairo. >> egypt, on the brink of a new e
whereby 1,122,000,000-dollar have been pledged by the federal government to construct the federal subway and this is a schematic that shows how the grouting tubes will be installed with the anticipated grout that will help counteract any proposed building movement if it was to occur this is a grouting away ray for the under cropping of the existing tubes at noter and market. this is the proposed grotting away next to the proposed chinatown station, similar grouting a away ray for the you know street market station, and proposed build protection for the -- station and this represented three of the repeatedly acquired agreements that we have received that are removed from your action today and that completes my presentation thank you. >> thank you colleagues any questions to the m ta okay seeing none let me ask are there any members of public that wish to speak in support of against any of these resolutions? seeing none. -- you got it -- you have got a city subway particular to ride you got a ticket to ride and ... i don't know why you are riding so light rail. you will do right you w
libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and accolades. he was the same guy. lingering one night after dinner to help me with a difficult table, i referred to him as sir or ambassador. he looked at me for a second, he sighs and he said i wish everyone would just call me chris. he loved the work, loved the people, but he never took himself too seriously. people talk about what a good diplomat he was. he knew how to motivate others to be the same. even those down on their careers, lost faith, in hardship. this was a tough task to inspire other to serve with dignity and self-respect. chris knew how to do that. nothing we can say here can make up for the heart ache and
hard-earned profit. not giving them to the government to feed the beast that keeps spending and spending our money. instead they're allowed to hang onto a small portion of their profits. >> that is actually not really accurate. there have been numbers of studies, most recently from the organisation for economic co-operation and development but also last year we saw a bill proposed in congress from senator sanders and representative ellison, all of which identify over $10 billion annually that are going to the fossil fuel industry in subsidies. melissa: but you say hard-earned dollars. congress doesn't have any money. they don't have money to give the money they have is my money taken from me. it is companies money they have paid in. it is tax revenue. exxon is hanging on to earnings, rather these are deductions rather than sending even more tax dollars they're paying less tax based on investments they're making. you're calling those things subsidies. that is not congress's money that is exxon's money hanging on to but they're not taking money back. they're hanging onto the m
-- nobody thought ronald reagan was raising taxes to create a bigger government. they thought if he needed it, it must be serious. what we have today is no innovation. no reform, no new thinking, no creativity, no hearings on waste. no hearings of better ways of doings things. you live until the age of the ipad and the iphone, and of google and a facebook and twitter, and you're faced with a federal government which currently runs at the pace of manual typewriter. [laughter] you have no serious -- in that sense we're told by people who are running a disaster we need more of your money to prop up a disaster. we can't reform. it's a bipartisan failure. now the last thing i want it talk about is how washington would have dealt with this. washington is the most important single american. we would not have won the american revolutionary war without him. we might well not have gotten a constitution without him and might not have been able to find a orderly system of self-government. we stand on his shoulders. and washington was very big on listening to people who knew what they were doing. hesp
happening as well, government starts to become smarter, make better decisions, better policies. this term algorithmic regulation, which means you can have laws and policies in the cities determined by data and not just what we think is best, but what's actually best. so, as cities keep catching on and more and more with the data, you're going to see some really interesting things coming out. >> cool. while we're talking about data, another part of the announcement today was also motion loft making private data available within sort of that initiative and that website wrieri'd like to hear a little more, john, about kind of deciding to share that data with the city and also a lot of times especially with other companies you see them being very protective of their data. there is a lot of value there. how do you sort of balance, protecting the value of your data and commercial viability versus making it available to the public? >> so, we have a unique problem, i think, to a lot of start-ups in the fact that we have a product that we sell and a lot of different vertical. we also have data we
. opposition activists say a government warplane fired on civilians while they were waiting to buy bread. at least 15 people were reported killed. the fighting continues to rage in other parts of the country. in the northern province of aleppo, rebels said they have shifted their strategy. they have been surrounding military bases and airports loyal to the regime, but the army has kept up the pressure. this unverified video is said to show a government attack on a suburb of damascus. it is relatively calm in the capital itself, but for the city's christian community, there is little festive spirit to be felt during the holiday. >> this christmas, i am praying for syria. you cannot feel the christmas atmosphere this year. we hope next year will be better. >> security concerns have put a damper on the celebrations, and midnight mass was rescheduled for the afternoon. christians there said they prayed for peace in their city. >> now, reports from cassocks and say that a military transport plane has crashed in the south of the country, killing at least 27 people -- reports from kazakhstan. t
groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposition activ
to welcome the community into city hall - because you remind us our purpose in government so to serve and you you certainly bring life and culture and community into our very state halls and bring life to us, so thank you again. i want to thank the nominating committee and the planning committee for their excellent work in ensuring that those very important community members who do so much to ensure that our communities remain strong and vibrant, those who are under served typically continue to be served that our communities are strengthened and our ties are bound and strong. so, in 2012, of this year, we are very lucky enough to have two very distinguished honorees for our distinguished service a word for the city and county of san francisco and the first person we will recognize tonight is vera noon tear if you can please u.s.a. plast she is the social director at the arab culture and community center and she helps hundreds of families in trans by providing social work service and is i know how important that work is and how difficult that work is and i can't thank you enough to ensure t
francisco government tv. the camera in front is only aimed at the podium. it is not taking shots of the audience, only the podium for people who want to ask questions. so do not worry, you are not on tv if you do not want to be. >> thank you for your patience. i am a representative with leader pelosi, and i'm thrilled to have you today to learn more of our best practices for accessing credit. it is a priority for our office. we are very well aware of how small businesses are running up against the wall right now in terms of trying to get the credit and loans they are looking for, so i will try hard to bring the brightest minds in this room so you can effectively fix their range and learn more about what you can do better to fix your business plan and what it is they are looking for. first of all, i will introduce everyone. mark quinn is the san francisco district director of the u.s. small business administration. the small business administration covers not only san francisco proper but the bay area. the severed his third district is responsible for a business loan portfolio of
observation on the unchanging nature of governance comes in its screen play based in part on the book "team of rivals." recently, the script received the new york film critics circle award, one of what will doubtless be many honors. tony first came to most people's attention with the epic pla "angels in america," a devastating account of the a.i.d.s. epidemic while it was at its worst. tony received both a tony award and the pulitzer prize for drama as well as a primetime emmy award for its television adaptation on hbo. that was some 20 years ago. in the years since, tony's reputation as one of our most accomplished and sometimes controversial modern play writes has only grown. welcome. >> thank you. >> you said you worked six years. how did you go about the research? >> i just started reading. we started with doris' book. i was curious to read it. it's a great read and a great book, but it's the definition of a thing that can turn into a 2 1/2 hour script. i knew immediately from what i had read there was going to be too much material if we tried to cover the whole thing and the civil war
test case for reasons. one is dpap the american government is so wonderfulfully transparent and carefully chronicled you can get information not just about every president but every person that almost became president and you can get the memos that you wrote to each other. i think we should do this and argue about it. i can see, okay, if it wasn't abraham lincoln who was likely to become president in 1860. i can get an answer. it almost certainly would have been william henry who was the secretary of state. that's great. i can go back and look at the memo he wrote to lincoln about what he wanted to do and what lincoln wanted to do and what was cone. i can get a good proxy for what might have happened if the ore would have gotten the job. measure what the impact of lincoln was. if you're thinking about individual impact, i don't think it makes any sents to say the person was here about decision was made therefore it's about them. if anybody would have made that same decision, it's not about them. japan attacks pearl harbor on december 7, 1941, franklin roosevelts has to decid
by the syrian military. that is one of the reasons they believe they come under attack. the syrian government denies they attack civilians lined up for bread. more and more we hear about these incidents. the past two days we are told first in hama province hundreds of people were lined up. this was the first day on sunday the bakery had been opened, that the town had been liberated a few days before that. there were rebels in there and that's where it was targeted. the syrian government denies having done so. yesterday the very next day in homs province we hear of another bakery under attack. women and children were killed in that attack. terrible news. all playing out against the back drop of more diplomacy. people trying to come to some sort of solution there. it hasn't happen. there is fear more of these attacks will happen in the days and months to come. >> i am assuming the government does have some ability to be able to tell whether or not these are rebel groups or if these are women and children who are simply lined up to get bread. that sounds like an explanation that people really ar
. the government denies they are behind the attack saying it was the work of terrorists. >> rejecting international concern that they may use chemical weapons. >> yet another meeting in no solution. talks between brahimi and al assad ending with an exchange of views on the future. he said he set out his position on things. he explained to the syrian president his point of view on how to help the syrian people. the u.n. special envoy expressed concern that the continued fighting. the conflict in syria will continue into the new year. dozens were killed on sunday alone in central syria. army planes apparently bombing people waiting for food outside a bakery. rebels accused the regime of taking anger out on them. there had been increasing concern that they could use chemical weapons to hold on to power. the government refuses they would use chemical weapons. >> they will never use it. and that clear? firstly, they would not use it against the wrong people if they had won with in their geographical boundaries. -- against their own people. >> they claimed they seized this base near aleppo. >> in afghani
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